Online Google Dictionary

conscience 中文解釋 wordnet sense Collocation Usage
Noun
/ˈkänCHəns/,
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consciences, plural;
  1. An inner feeling or voice viewed as acting as a guide to the rightness or wrongness of one's behavior
    • - he had a guilty conscience about his desires
    • - Ben was suffering a pang of conscience

  1. motivation deriving logically from ethical or moral principles that govern a person's thoughts and actions
  2. conformity to one's own sense of right conduct; "a person of unflagging conscience"
  3. a feeling of shame when you do something immoral; "he has no conscience about his cruelty"
  4. Conscience is an aptitude, faculty, intuition, or judgment of the intellect that distinguishes right from wrong. Moral evaluations of this type may reference values or norms (principles and rules). ...
  5. Conscience is a 1993 album from British Pop band The Beloved. The album reached #2 on the UK Albums Chart on its release, and includes "Sweet Harmony", the first single taken from it, being the first single from the band which entered the UK Top Ten, peaking at Number 8. ...
  6. Conscience is the fourth album by Womack & Womack, released in 1988, containing the hit single "Teardrops".
  7. The moral sense of right and wrong, chiefly as it affects one's own behaviour; inwit; A personification of the moral sense of right and wrong, usually in the form of a person, a being or merely a voice that gives moral lessons and advices; Consciousness; thinking; awareness, especially self- ...
  8. the faculty of the human subject which enforces the moral law in a particular way for each individual by providing an awareness of what is right and wrong in each situation.
  9. To dream that your conscience censures you for deceiving some one, denotes that you will be tempted to commit wrong and should be constantly on your guard. To dream of having a quiet conscience, denotes that you will stand in high repute.
  10. Inner awareness of the difference between right and wrong in one's own actions, usually understood as a divinely-inspired moral sense. Although Aquinas noted that an individual conscience may err, Butler held that it is the fundamental motive for good conduct. ...
  11. (from NDE) (Latin conscientia: feeling, knowledge) Existentialists are divided in their view of conscience. Some consider conscience to be the moral voice within the individual, helpful and necessary. Others believe conscience to be the product of society and thus completely relative.
  12. There is no word in the Qur'an which exactly expresses the Christian conception of conscience. The word nafs , which, according to Arabic lexicons, expresses very much the same idea as the Hebrew hephesh, "life, aninial spirit, breath" (Job xii. ...
  13. Acquinas called it "the mind of man making moral judgements." It is variously understood as meaning the voice of God within us (Butler), our sense of moral right and wrong or our super-ego enforcing the rules of behaviour implanted within us when we were young (Freud). ...
  14. The imperfectly received or recognized working of one's spiritual being, in itself a spiritual activity of the inner god, which as yet is able to send only some faint gleams of light, truth, and harmony into the heavy and obscure brain-mind in which most people live. ...
  15. n.  The inner voice warning you that somebody is looking.
  16. Our internal 'voice' which tells us right from wrong, some people believe that this is the voice of God within us.
  17. (N) -the inner sense of what is right or wrong in one's conduct or motives, impelling one toward right action.
  18. Conscience is neither a thing we 'have' nor a place within the human psyche. It is something we do, that is best described in terms of a learned skill that the person acquires. ...
  19. An act of judgment, not a "feeling" or gut reaction. Conscience always makes particular judgments, about actual situations facing us. ...
  20. Conscience is simply, the act of thinking (judging) about moral norms.  It does not differ from other acts of rational thought except in its subject matter.  (See Gordon Clark, The Biblical Doctrine of Man, page 55.)
  21. The internalization of morality within an individual to the degree that it becomes an automatic response, akin in some ways to an emotion. (The physical location of the conscience within the brain has been found to be in the prefrontal cortex.)
  22. Internal standards of behavior, which usually control conduct and produce emotional discomfort when violated.
  23. A person's conscience...believer or non-believer...is the God-given capacity enabling that person's mental awareness to distinguish between right and wrong. But this conscience must be "programmed"; how was/is yours programmed? See how here.
  24. That faculty of the mind, or inborn sense of right and wrong, by which we judge of the moral character of human conduct. It is common to all men. Like all our other faculties, it has been perverted by the Fall (Joh 16:2; Act 26:9; Rom 2:15). ...
  25. one of two sectors that comprise the superego. Basically, an internalized critical parent. The conscience turns our innate destructiveness back upon ourselves and thereby safeguards the cohesion of society. At the same time, renunciations of drive strengthen the conscience. ...