Online Google Dictionary

consul 中文解釋 wordnet sense Collocation Usage
Noun
/ˈkänsəl/,
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consuls, plural;
  1. An official appointed by a government to live in a foreign city and protect and promote the government's citizens and interests there

  2. (in ancient Rome) One of the two annually elected chief magistrates who jointly ruled the republic

  3. Any of the three chief magistrates of the first French republic (1799–1804)


  1. a diplomat appointed by a government to protect its commercial interests and help its citizens in a foreign country
  2. Consul (abbrev. cos.; Latin plural consules) was the highest elected office of the Roman Republic and an appointive office under the Empire. The title was also used in other city states and also revived in modern states, notably in the First French Republic. ...
  3. Consul described by Pieter Cramer in 1776 is a South American nymphalid butterfly genus in the subfamily Charaxinae.
  4. The Hyperion Cantos is a series of science fiction novels by Dan Simmons. Set in the far future, and focusing more on plot and story development than technical detail, it falls into the soft science fiction category, and could be described as space opera. ...
  5. The title Consul is used for the official representatives of the government of one state in the territory of another, normally acting to assist and protect the citizens of the consul's own country, and to facilitate trade and friendship between the people of the country to whom he or she is ...
  6. The Consul is an opera in three acts with music and libretto by Gian Carlo Menotti, his first full-length opera. Its first performance was on March 1, 1950, in Philadelphia, with Patricia Neway as the lead heroine Magda Sorel and Rosemary Kuhlmann as the Secretary of the consulate . ...
  7. An official residing in a foreign country in order to protect the interests of citizens from his or her nation; Either of the two highest-ranking officials of the Roman republic
  8. (Consuls) Public officials stationed in a foreign country who are responsible for developing and securing the economic interests of their government and safeguarding the welfare of their government's citizens who might be traveling or residing within their jurisdiction.
  9. (consuls) (HEAR IT) during the ancient Roman Republic, served as military commanders and government leaders; elected by an ancient Roman assembly to serve for one year
  10. (consuls) Two chief executives or magistrates of the Roman republic; elected by an annual assembly dominated by aristocracy. (p. 153)
  11. The two consuls were theoretically of equal power, exercising their authority on alternate months. They were the chief magistrates, checking by veto any other except a tribune. ...
  12. In the aftermath of the coup of 18 Brumaire (9 November), the Constitution of the Year VIII (1799) gave executive power to three consuls who also exercised almost all legislative authority. ...
  13. Most nations maintain consulates in major foreign cities for the purposes of safeguarding their resident and traveling citizens, and for promotion and protection of business interests operating on foreign soil. ...
  14. (Latin) chief Roman magistrate who presided over the senate and assemblies and Rome's foreign affairs; consuls served as Rome's generals on military campaigns; following a consulship, the outgoing consul served as a proconsul.
  15. An official of the US Department of State. Consuls are located only outside the US and are responsible for issuing visas.
  16. [Latin] a Roman magistrate equivalent to a present-day prime minister or president.  The office was held for only one year to discourage corruption, then rotated to another Roman noble.  Generally two were appointed by the Comitia Centuriata for each term. ...
  17. top military and civil official of the republic. Two consuls were elected to serve simultaneously for a one-year period. Though still prestigious, the consulship offered little real power in the imperial age. ...
  18. One of the two chief magistrates of the ancient Roman republic. They exercised most of the powers associated with the monarchy. Consuls were initially elected from the patrician families, but after 367 the plebeians gained the right of electing one of the Consuls from among themselves. ...
  19. In the empire, the Office of Consul was the highest in the Senate, sometimes held by the emperor himself. While there was no political power attached to the position, it commanded respect. Shown as COS – on coins, followed by numbers indicating times office held.
  20. The Consul coordinates our demonstrations.
  21. in Ancient Rome, an official from the Patrician class that supervised the government and commanded the armies.