Online Google Dictionary

stirrup 中文解釋 wordnet sense Collocation Usage
Noun
/ˈstərəp/,/ˈstə-rəp/,/ˈstir-/,
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stirrups, plural;
  1. Each of a pair of devices attached to each side of a horse's saddle, in the form of a loop with a flat base to support the rider's foot

  2. A pair of metal supports in which a woman's heels may be placed during gynecological examinations and childbirth, to hold her legs in a position that will facilitate medical examination or intervention


  1. support consisting of metal loops into which rider's feet go
  2. stapes: the stirrup-shaped ossicle that transmits sound from the incus to the cochlea
  3. A stirrup is a light frame or ring that holds the foot of a rider, attached to a saddle by a strap, often called a stirrup leather. Stirrups are usually paired and are used to aid in mounting and as a support while using a riding animal (usually a horse or other equine, such as a mule). ...
  4. A foot rest used by horse-riders; A stapes; referring to women’s pants, a form of trousers commonly worn by women that includes a strap beneath the arch of the foot
  5. (stirrups) technique of ankle strapping using rigid tape placed on the ankle, medial to lateral adhering to the undersurface of the heel, mimicking a stirrup.
  6. (Stirrups) Metal “D” shaped rings into which a jockey places his/her feet. Also known as “irons”.
  7. (STIRRUPS) Where jockeys' feet are place when mounting; the Irons
  8. (Stirrups) 2" Natural rawhide bell, hand laced.
  9. (Stirrups) Some hockey socks have a layer of material that goes under the bottom of the skater’s foot. These stirrups hold the socks down.  However, many players do not like this layer of cloth and cut the stirrups off.
  10. (Stirrups) a place to keep your feet when riding for support in the western saddle.
  11. (stirrups) the part of the saddle that supports a rider’s feet; metal for English saddles (thus often called "stirrup irons") and wood-and-leather for Western saddles.
  12. Stirrups are used as balance for the rider.
  13. The stirrups are metal loops connected to the saddle with a flat foot piece through which a rider puts his foot for support.
  14. a device hung from each side of a saddle to receive the rider's foot.  Stirrups come in different widths and cowboys prefer different style stirrups for different tasks.
  15. Device for securing a horseman's feet, enabling him to wield weapons more effectively. First evidence of the use of stirrups was among the Kushan people of northern Afghanistan in approximately the first century C.E. (p. 206)
  16. First step of freight car, under the lowest grab iron
  17. a loop, ring, or other contrivance suspended from the saddle on a horse to support the rider's foot; meaning "a rope for mounting", and originating in Assyria (ca850BC), then used in Han dynasty China (ca202BC), and introduced to Europe during the fifth century by the marauding Huns, which ...
  18. The third (and smallest) of the three middle ear bones. Technically knows as the stapes. It is the smallest bone in our bodies.
  19. metal loop embedded or bolted to the concrete to support a post usually of timber.
  20. Device for holding the crossbow with feet while cocking; usually 'D' or 'T' shaped, sometimes made from webbing or rope.
  21. (1) A reinforcement used to resist shear and diagonal tension stresses in a concrete structural member. (2) A steel bar bent into a \"U\" or box shape and installed perpendicular to, or at an angle to the longitudinal reinforcement, and properly anchored. ...
  22. An apparatus hung from both sides of a saddle where the cowboy puts his feet as he rides his horse.
  23. In reinforced concrete beams or slabs, a U-shaped bar inserted for the purpose of resisting diagonal tension, or so-called shear.
  24. A pair of devices attached to each side of a horse's saddle, in the form of a loop with a flat base to support the rider's foot.
  25. U-shaped bar providing a stirrup-like support for a member in timber and metal bridges; U-shaped bar placed in concrete constructions to resist diagonal tension stresses.